Our performance in detail

5
Pāpori me te hākinakina
Social and recreation

We aim for strong, healthy communities

The challenges we face

  • Balancing rising community demand and expectations of services against pressure on costs to ratepayers
  • Managing our recreation asset/facility portfolio in a time where there are changing patterns of recreation
  • Reducing rising inequality, homelessness and street begging
  • Enhancing household and community resilience, while maintaining the city’s existing strengths such as safety, open and tolerant attitudes, and high quality of life

Our strategic approach

  • Promoting and facilitating strong, safe, heathy communities by ensuring infrastructure is in place to meet community needs
  • Maximising the social return on community assets and facilities through making them multi-purpose where possible, for example the proposed Johnsonville community hub
  • Contributing to residents’ health and safety by supporting and facilitating the work of organisations that operate in this space, and providing facilities and services where the market and Central Government do not meet community needs
  • Promoting social cohesion by supporting and partnering with organisations that work on reducing marginalisation, discrimination, inequality and exclusion

In this section
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5.1 Recreation promotion and support

5.2 Community support

5.3 Public health and safety

Snapshot

5.1 Recreation promotion and support

What we did:

How we performed

Users who are satisfied with ASB Sports Centre (%)

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2017

Bar graph showing users who are satisfied with ASB Sports Centre.

Target exceeded by 6% and increasing trend. Attendance at ASB Sports Centre has increased by more than 110,000 from last year. Key to this success has been securing a number of major national and international events, as well as improving and increasing the number of programmes for children.

Users who are satisfied with our grass sportsfields (%)

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2017

Bar graph showing users who are satisfied with our grass sportsfields.

Target not met (-15%). The wet summer and autumn has had an impact on the use of grass sportsfields. While targets for the number of scheduled games played were met, there were a higher than usual number of games cancelled, which has affected some sporting codes and decreased overall user satisfaction.

Users who are satisfied with our artificial sportsfields (%)

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2017

Bar graph showing users who are satisfied with our artificial sportsfields.

Target not met (-8%) and declining trend. Although there has been some increase in utilisation during winter months, satisfaction may be affected by the cost and unpredictable weather.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity area are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost
Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance*
2016/17
5.1.1 Swimming pools          
Expenditure 20,520 21,138 21,008 20,924 (84)
Revenue (6,806) (7,017) (7,100) (7,551) (451)
Net Expenditure 13,714 14,121 13,907 13,373 (534)1
5.1.2 Sportsfields         -
Expenditure 3,417 3,272 3,615 3,514 (100)
Revenue (319) (273) (292) (301) (9)
Net Expenditure 3,098 2,999 3,322 3,213 (109)
5.1.3 Sportsfields (synthetic)          
Expenditure 1,237 1,258 1,401 1,353 (48)
Revenue (418) (473) (544) (534) 10
Net Expenditure 819 785 857 819 (38)
5.1.4 Recreation centres          
Expenditure 9,705 9,425 9,253 9,998 745
Revenue (2,653) (2,754) (2,995) (2,707) 288
Net Expenditure 7,052 6,671 6,257 7,290 1,0332
5.1.5 Recreation partnerships         -
Expenditure 1,049 992 1,115 1,107 (8)
Revenue - - - - -
Net Expenditure 1,049 992 1,115 1,107 (8)
5.1.6 Playgrounds          
Expenditure 746 759 816 795 (22)
Revenue - - - - -
Net Expenditure 746 759 816 795 (22)
5.1.7 Marinas          
Expenditure 511 565 609 673 65
Revenue (582) (596) (596) (603) (7)
Net Expenditure (71) (31) 12 70 58
5.1.8 Golf course          
Expenditure 221 225 208 260 53
Revenue (58) (60) (55) (92) (36)
Net Expenditure 163 165 152 169 17
5.1.9 Recreation programmes          
Expenditure 345 252 470 280 (191)
Revenue (59) (128) (247) (15) 232
Net Expenditure 286 124 223 264 41
5.1 Total Recreation promotion and support          
Expenditure 37,751 37,886 38,493 38,904 412
Revenue (10,895) (11,301) (11,831) (11,803) 28
Net Expenditure 26,856 26,585 26,662 27,101 439
*Variance explanations to finances – why our actual spend differs from what was budgeted.
1. Over budget due to lower revenue from user charges and higher depreciation costs.
2. Under budget due to lower interest costs and higher revenue from user charges.

How we performed

Visits to swimming pools

Source: Wellington City Council

Bar graph showing visits to swimming pools .

Target exceeded by 5% and visitor numbers up slightly on last year.

Visits to recreation centres and ASB Sports Centre

Source: Wellington City Council

Bar graph showing visits to recreation centres and ASB Sports Centre.

Target exceeded by 15%. Attendance at all recreation centres and the ASB Sports Centre has increased this year. There has been a focus on the programmes we are delivering, which has seen an overall increase in attendance numbers, and the ASB Sports Centre hosted a number of key national and international events.

Tenants who are satisfied with services and facilities (%)

Source: 2017 Tenant Survey

Bar graph showing tenants who are satisfied with services and facilities .

Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance*
2016/17
5.1.1 Swimming pools          
Expenditure 5,185 2,535 686 1,853 1,1671
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       1,166  
5.1.2 Sportsfields          
Expenditure 517 1,125 849 905 56
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       75  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years          
5.1.3 Sportsfields (synthetic)          
Expenditure 47 223 3,678 1,789 (1,552)2
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       337  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       184  
5.1.4 Recreation centres          
Expenditure 27 112 88 77 (11)
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       14  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years          
5.1.5 Recreation partnerships          
Expenditure 234 857 2,938 1,597 1,7593
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       3,100  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       1,759  
5.1.6 Playgrounds          
Expenditure 602 429 304 455 151
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years          
5.1.7 Marinas          
Expenditure 92 524 165 141 12
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       36  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       12  
5.1 Total Recreation promotion and support          
Expenditure 6,704 5,805 8,708 6,817 1,671
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       3,562  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       3,121  
*Variance explanations to finances – why our actual spend differs from what was budgeted.
1. Under budget due to changes in the Freyberg Pool maintenance closure, where some components were able to be delayed until the next pool closure allowing parts of the facility to remain open throughout the work.
2. Over budget due to approved changes in the budget available. The Council approved an additional $1.4 million for this project in August 2016, $0.8 million of this funded by sports groups. Also an addition $0.2 million of unbudgeted external revenue has been received from sports groups.
3. Under budget largely due to the delay in the work on the RA Vance Stand at the Basin Reserve.

How we performed

Tenants who rate the overall condition of their house/apartment as good or very good (%)

Source: 2017 Tenant Survey

Bar graph showing tenants who rate the overall condition of their house/apartment as good or very good.

Users who are satisfied with library services and facilities (%)

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2017

Bar graph showing users who are satisfied with library services and facilities .

Satisfaction remains high at 92%.

Users who are satisfied with the online library collection (%)

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2017

Bar graph showing users who are satisfied with the online library collection.

Target exceeded by 15%. New interfaces for PressReader (online newspapers) and RBdigital (downloadable e-magazines) were introduced this year, with positive feedback from – and increased use by – library customers.

5.2 Community supportTop

What we did

How we performed

Residents who are registered members of Wellington City Libraries (%)

Source: Wellington City Council

Bar graph showing residents who are registered members of Wellington City Libraries.

Target exceeded by 12% due to a softening in approach to closing long-dormant membership accounts. Performance objectives will be set to reflect current customer membership environment targets.

Visits to libraries

Source: Wellington City Council

Bar graph showing visits to libraries .

Target nearly met (-8%). Physical visitor numbers are slightly down on the last 2 years (-4%).

Library items issued

Source: Wellington City Council

Bar graph showing library items issued .

Target nearly met (-7%). The number of items issued was slightly down on last year (-4%).

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity area are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost
Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance*
2016/17
5.2.1 Libraries          
Expenditure 20,635 21,129 22,273 22,495 222
Revenue (1,542) (1,452) (1,361) (1,484) (123)
Net Expenditure 19,093 19,677 20,911 21,010 99
5.2.2 Access support (Leisure Card)          
Expenditure 56 102 112 102 (10)
Revenue - - - - -
Net Expenditure 56 102 112 102 (10)
5.2.3 Community advocacy          
Expenditure 1,487 1,329 1,431 1,219 (212)
Revenue (11) (9) (19) - 19
Net Expenditure 1,476 1,320 1,412 1,219 (193)
5.2.4 Grants (Social and Recreation)          
Expenditure 2,749 3,643 4,440 4,224 (216)
Revenue (19) (23) (19) - 19
Net Expenditure 2,730 3,620 4,421 4,224 (197)1
5.2.5 Housing          
Expenditure 24,500 22,294 23,886 25,105 1,220
Revenue (35,866) (34,256) (35,582) (37,278) (1,696)
Net Revenue (11,366) (11,962) (11,697) (12,173) (476)2
5.2.6 Community centres and halls          
Expenditure 3,010 3,248 3,868 3,473 (395)
Revenue (281) (364) (333) (235) 98
Net Expenditure 2,729 2,884 3,535 3,238 (297)
5.2 Total Community support          
Expenditure 52,437 51,745 56,009 56,618 609
Revenue (37,719) (36,104) (37,315) (38,997) (1,683)
Net Expenditure 14,718 15,641 18,694 17,620 (1,074)
*Variance explanations to finances – why our actual spend differs from what was budgeted.
1. Over budget on grant spend due to payment of expenses allocated (and expected to be incurred) against the 2017/18 budget.
2. Over budget due to the timing of the recognition of the Crown funding for the Housing Upgrade Programme. This is partly offset by lower depreciation costs and higher housing rental income, where some sites expected to be offline due to the upgrade programme are still being tenanted.

How we performed

Visits to the library website

Source: Wellington City Council

Bar graph showing visits to the library website.

Target exceeded by 58%. The performance measure for total number of visitor sessions was set before our adoption of the “WCL Mini” app. While the overall website usage increase is modest, the number of active WCL Mini users increased by 25%, and app downloads increased by 61%.

Number of uses of the Leisure Card

Source: Recreation Wellington

Bar graph showing number of uses of the Leisure Card .

Upward trend.

Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance*
2016/17
5.2.1 Libraries          
Expenditure 2,255 4,566 3,474 9,521 6,9981
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       950  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       6,674  
5.2.5 Housing          
Expenditure 19,167 14,940 15,090 23,861 10,4762
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       1,706  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       9,558  
5.2.6 Community centres and halls          
Expenditure 19 146 192 262 70
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       70  
5.2 Total Community support          
Expenditure 21,441 19,652 18,756 33,644 17,544
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       2,656  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       16,302  
*Variance explanations to finances – why our actual spend differs from what was budgeted.
1. Under budget mainly due to delays in the upgrade of the Johnsonville Library.
2. Under budget mainly due to delays in the Housing Upgrade Programme work at the Arlington complex.

5.3 Public health and safetyTop

What we did:

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost
Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance*
2016/17
5.3.1 Burials and cremations          
Expenditure 2,310 1,626 1,608 1,655 47
Revenue (816) (764) (807) (858) (51)
Net Expenditure 1,494 862 801 797 (4)
5.3.2 Public toilets          
Expenditure 2,614 3,048 2,986 2,962 (24)
Revenue - - - - -
Net Expenditure 2,614 3,048 2,986 2,962 (24)
5.3.3 Public Health Regulations          
Expenditure 4,675 5,188 5,449 5,253 (196)
Revenue (3,089) (3,266) (3,370) (3,245) 126
Net Expenditure 1,586 1,922 2,079 2,009 (70)
5.3.4 City safety          
Expenditure 2,234 2,791 3,203 2,815 (388)
Revenue (46) (51) (31) - 31
Net Expenditure 2,188 2,740 3,172 2,815 (357)
5.3.5 WREMO          
Expenditure 1,322 1,394 4,909 1,534 (3,375)
Revenue (34) (20) (2,245) (18) 2,227
Net Expenditure 1,288 1,374 2,664 1,517 (1,148)1
5.3 Total Public health and safety          
Expenditure 13,155 14,047 18,155 14,220 (3,935)
Revenue (3,985) (4,101) (6,453) (4,120) 2,333
Net Expenditure 9,170 9,946 11,702 10,099 (1,603)
*Variance explanations to finances – why our actual spend differs from what was budgeted.
1. Over budget due to unbudgeted emergency management costs as a result of the November earthquake.

Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance
2016/17
5.3.1 Burials and cremations          
Expenditure 176 445 576 316 40
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       300  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       84  
5.3.2 Public toilets          
Expenditure 865 295 2,102 1,622 209
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       689  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years          
5.3.5 WREMO          
Expenditure - 72 43 73 30
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       30  
5.3 Total Public health and safety          
Expenditure 1,041 812 2,721 2,011 279
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       989  
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward to future years       114  
Total costs
Net Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance
2016/17
SOCIAL AND RECREATION 50,744 52,172 57,058 54,820 (2,238)
Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2014/15
Actual
2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Budget
2016/17
Variance
2016/17
Unspent portion of budget brought forward from prior years       7,207  
Annual Plan budget amount 2016/17       42,471  
SOCIAL AND RECREATION 29,186 26,269 30,186 49,679 19,493

Performance data

The following section outlines our performance data: outcome indicators, performance measures, and supplementary tables.

We use outcome indicators to monitor our city over time, which provides information on trends that may influence our performance including those outside our control. We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets as set out in the Long-term Plan and Annual Plans.

Performance data – outcome indicators

The following section outlines outcome indicators for the Social and Recreation area of activity. Outcome indicators do not have targets – only trend data.

Council outcome indicator Source   2014/15 2015/16 2016/17
Residents’ usage of City Council community and recreation facilities WCC RMS 2017 Community Centre 22% 20% 23%
    Community Hall 19% 21% 19%
Residents who agree that Wellington offers a wide range of recreation activities WCC RMS 2017   85% 82% 85%
Residents’ frequency of physical activity WCC RMS 2017   71% 74% 73%
Residents who perceive there to be barriers to participating in recreation activities WCC RMS 2017   See supplementary tables    
Residents’ importance of sense of community in local neighbourhood WCC RMS 2017 Biennial Result 75% 2014
Residents’ usage of libraries and frequency of use WCC RMS 2017   See supplementary tables    
Residents who engage in neighbourly actions WCC RMS 2017   See supplementary tables    
Housing Services tenants who report positive social contact 2017 Tenant Survey   94% 94% 93%
Residents’ perceptions – city and community safety issues of most concern WCC RMS 2017   See supplementary tables    
Recorded crime and resolution rates – by categories NZ Police   *Police changed the way they report crime statistics    
Number of notifications of the most prevalent food and water-borne diseases WCC Public Health   207 197 207
Residents’ life expectancy Statistics NZ   2012-14
Male 80.9
Female 84.2
   
Food premises – number of cleaning notices and closures per year WCC Public Health Cleaning notices 17 8 10
    Closures 1 2 -
Percentage of food premises with an inspection rating of excellent or very good that maintain or improve their inspection rating WCC Public Health   99% 93% 96%
Number of uses of Leisure Card Recreation Wellington   126,316 138,447 141,763
Dog control – complaints received (% of registered dogs) WCC Public Health   22% 24% 21%
Performance data – Council performance measures

The following section outlines Council performance measures for our Social and Recreation services. It includes data for the last 3 years to show trends and includes variances explanations for relevant areas.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES   2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 Actual 2016/17 Target %
Variance
5.1 Recreation promotion and support            
To measure the quality and usage (quantity) of the recreation facilities we provide            
User (%) satisfaction – swimming pools   85% 88% 87% 90% -3%
User (%) satisfaction Recreation Centres 85% 87% 88% 90% -2%
  ASB Sports Centre 86% 91% 95% 90% 6%
User (%) satisfaction – sportsfields Grass 78% 73%* 72% 85% -15%
* Previously reported in 2015/16 Annual Report as 42% incorrectly due to a calculation error. Artificial turf 89% 84% 78% 85% -8%
Visits to facilities – swimming pools   1,234,238 1,300,700 1,318,555 1,260,000 5%
Visits to facilities – recreation centres and ASB Sports Centre   324,878 1,077,573 1,223,588 1,060,000 15%
ASB Sports Centre courts utilisation (%)   46% 50% 56% 45% 24%
Sportsfields – % of scheduled sports games and training that take place Winter 88% 79% 84% 80% 5%
  Summer 99% 99% 92% 90% 2%
       
             
Marinas occupancy   98% 96% 98% 96% 2%
Artificial sportsfields % utilisation Peak Winter 68% 68% 79% 80% -1%
  Peak Summer 32% 36% 34% 40% -15%
  Off-peak Winter 25% 15% 19% 25% -24%
  Off-peak Summer 11% 10% 8% 20% -60%
During the summer months the level of interest from customers to use the artificial turf is lower as the weather enables schools to utilise their own fields. With the addition of Alex Moore Park, there are now more hours available for use, which also has impacted on the measure reported.      
PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 Actual 2016/17 Target %
Variance
5.2 Community support          
To measure the quality and usage (quantity) of the housing services we provide          
Tenant satisfaction (%) with services and facilities 94% 94% 96% 90% 7%
Tenant rating (%) of the overall condition of their house/apartment (average, good and very good) 95% 96% 94% 90% 4%
Tenant (%) sense of safety in their complex at night 78% 75% 78% 75% 1%
Occupancy rate of available housing facilities 95% 94% 97% 90% 8%
All tenants (existing and new) housed within policy 99% 99% 97% 98% -1%
To measure the progress of the Housing Upgrade Project          
Agreed milestones, design standards and budgets are met in accordance with the agreed works programme and Deed of Grant between the Crown and the Council Achieved Achieved Achieved To Achieve Met
To measure the quality and usage (quantity) of our community and recreation support services (including libraries)          
Libraries – user (%) satisfaction with services and facilities 87% 93% 92% 90% 2%
E-library – user satisfaction (%) with the online library collection 84% 85% 86% 75% 15%
Accessible Wellington Action Plan initiatives planned for next year 77% 85% NA 90% NA
No initiaitives were planned for the 2016/17.          
The proportion of grants fund successfully allocated (through milestones being met) 100% 100% 92% 95% -3%
Proportion of outcomes delivered (previous projects) – weighted by $ value 100% 100% 94% 90% 4%
Libraries – residents (%) who are registered members 77% 79% 84% 75% 12%
Libraries – physical visits 2,276,034 2,248,409 2,159,555 2,400,000 -8%
Libraries – website visits 3,630,775 3,809,967 3,939,631 2,500,000 58%
Library items issued 2,902,402 2,923,042 2,811,921 3,000,000 -7%
Occupancy rates (%) of Wellington City Council Community Centres and Halls 34% 39% 45% 45% 0%
PERFORMANCE MEASURES   2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 Actual 2016/17 Target %
Variance
5.3 Public health and safety            
To measure the quality of our public health and safety services and programmes and our timeliness in responding to service requests            
Dog control – urgent requests responded to within 1 hour and non-urgent requests responded to within 24 hours Urgent 100% 100% 91% 100% -9%
  Non-urgent 99% 100% 97% 99% -2%
WCC public toilets – urgent requests responded to within 4 hours and non-urgent requestes responded to within 3 days Urgent 99% 100% 100% 100% 0%
  Non-urgent 99% 100% 98% 95% 3%
WCC public toilets (%) that meet required cleanliness and maintenance performance standards   100% 100% 98% 95% 3%
Percentage of alcohol inspections carried out for medium to very high-risk premises   100% 100% 100% 100% 0%
Percentage of alcohol inspections carried out for medium to very high-risk premises during high trading hours   35% 28% 17% 25% -34%
This result reflects the number of inspections carried out rather than the number of premises visited. As some premises are visited multiple times, the measure does not accurately demonstrate the effectiveness of performance and will be adjusted for next financial year      
Graffiti removal – response timeframes met   new 85% 83% 80% 4%

Performance data – supplementary tables
Residents’ perceptions that there are barriers to participating in recreation activities 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17
Too busy 47% 43% 49%
Poor health 6% 8% 7%
Activity costs too much 26% 29% 26%
Activity too far away 19% 23% 21%
No facilities for child care 5% 5% 5%
Weather 34% 29% 28%
Not at a convenient time 21% 20% 23%
Shift work 6% 6% 5%
Lack of motivation 22% 22% 25%
No facilities exist 1% 2% 2%
Tiredness 20%* 23% 23%
Lack of knowledge about how to do it 15% 12% 13%
Environmental factors (eg road conditions) 3% 3% 3%
Lack of parking or transport 20% 22% 20%
Nothing or not interested 10% 12% 14%
Other (specify) 8% 6% 7%
Don't know 1% 0% 0%

* Reported incorrectly in 2015/16 Annual Report as 30%

Source: Wellington City Council Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2017

Residents’ usage (%) of libraries and frequency of use 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17
More than once a week 4% 5% 6%
Once a week 15% 15% 14%
Once every 2-3 weeks 24% 20% 25%
Once a month 19% 20% 20%
Once every 2-3 months 21% 19% 19%
Once every 4-6 months 7% 12% 8%
Less often than once every 6 months 8% 9% 8%
Don't know 1% 1% 0%

Source: Wellington City Council Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2017

Residents who engage in neighbourly actions 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17
Spoken to a neighbour 92% 91% 89%
Given help to a neighbour 58% 62% 55%
Received help from a neighbour 47% 49% 46%
Participated in an activity with a neighbour 38% 36% 33%
Discussed emergency preparedness with a neighbour 16% 14% 21%
None of the above 7% 7% 10%

Source: Wellington City Council Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2017

Residents’ perceptions of city safety issues of most concern 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17
Which of the following, if any, are particularly concerning in Wellington at present?      
Poorly lit or dark public areas such as streets, paths and parks 61% 63% 59%
Vandalism such as broken windows in shops and public buildings 26% 27% 17%
Graffiti 34% 32% 16%
Poorly maintained or dangerous public areas such as streets, paths and parks 34% 37% 32%
Traffic, including busy roads and lack of pedestrian facilities 34% 33% 33%
Dangerous driving including speeding, drunk drivers and so on 29% 30% 33%
Alcohol and drug problems 51% 49% 46%
Car theft or vandalism, and theft from cars 36% 32% 29%
Threatening people and/or people behaving dangerously 48% 51% 46%
Other (specify) 11% 10% 6%
Nothing 5% 5% 3%
Don't know 1% 2% 1%

Source: Wellington City Council Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2017

Case study
Reducing homelessness/Te MahanaTop

The Council has been involved in responding to homelessness for many years. In 2003, we set up a Homeless Taskforce, which led to the creation of our first homeless strategy the following year. In 2013, the Taskforce came up with a citywide strategy, Te Mahana, to end homelessness by 2020.

The Council funds Te Whakamura Ai Te Ahi, which means “to keep the home fires burning”. This is a partnership between three community agencies – Downtown Community Ministry (DCM), Ngati Kahungunu ki Poneke Community Services Inc., and the Compassion Soup Kitchen – that delivers a range of services for the homeless, with a particular focus on a “housing first” approach. The Council has committed ongoing funding to this partnership, and in the past 12 months has supported it through combined contract funding of $458,000.

We also approved $137,668 in community grants for DCM, $72,666 for the Compassion Soup Kitchen, and $100,016 for Ngati Kahungunu ki Poneke Community Services.